From: Dan Hegarty <danh@expressmedicals.co.uk>
To: Professor Ozay Mehmet <mehmet5010@rogers.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2012 8:38:08 AM
Subject: Uzan Ali

Hello Professor Mehmet.

I recently returned from a short holiday in Belek, Turkey. Whilst there, your novel provided some excellent holiday reading. Congratulations upon writing such a readable, informative and reflective tale.

My wife was born in Larnaca and is of “turk cypriot” extraction. She came to London in 1973 and her parents live near Kyrenia. The book enhanced my insight into the history of Cyprus and the end of the Ottoman epoch.

The story of the Ali family is an entertaining read in itself.

For myself, the most interesting aspects were the “universal” issues that affect peoples from all communities. Some of the things that seem to have common resonance include :

A. Redemption through forgiveness, albeit on a personal/relationship level or a wider politico-ethnico-cultural level.

I am part irish and so am very familiar with some of the challenges that the turkish and greek communities do face in “healing” their respective grievances.

My own experience of life up until now leads me to believe that it is difficult, and perhaps impossible, to achieve contentment without the capacity to forgive both self and others.

B. The need to embrace change, albeit to survive or to embrace the wonderful variety of experiences and the cornucopian spread of opportunities that life can offer.

C. The concept of a diaspora and all its ramifications within ethnic groups, both advantageous and otherwise.

D. The huge importance of education in faciltating personal growth and success.

E. The value of family and ancestry in helping shaping each of us.

F. The book also reminded me that people are very similar the world over. Every family has successes, failures, issues, dysfunction etc. This is, I believe, a truism irrespective of nation, religion or wealth. Perhaps the Uzan Ali clan is a microcosm for humanity?

Thank you for writing your book.

Good luck in your own life.

Dr Dan Hegarty.
(London).
Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device

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